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Yaoi God in the Skies Average 5 / 5 out of 1
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Alternative
新晋上仙腐神君
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Updating
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Updating
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Summary

Because humans prayed, gods came into being. The “Yaoi” God communicated with us in this way. Moon God holds the view that men and women should wed, whereas Yaoi God maintains that a person’s gender is irrelevant to their love for another. What will occur as a result of the clash between the progressive thinking of Yaoi and the conventional thinking of Moon?

 

Yaoi (/jai/; Japanese: [ja.o.i]) is a genre of fictional media that originated in Japan that includes homoerotic interactions between male characters. It is also known as the wasei-eigo construction guys’ love (, bizu rabu), and its acronym is BL (, beru). [a] It is separate from homoerotic media marketed to homosexual men, which is known as bara (, lit. ‘rose’), although it does attract a male audience and may be made by male artists. Typically, it is developed by women for women, but it can also be produced by men. It encompasses a broad variety of forms of entertainment, including as manga, anime, drama CDs, books, video games, television programs, movies, and fan works. Even though the phrases “Boys’ love” and “BL” are used by certain fans and pundits in the West, the term “yaoi” is still more widely widespread in English. “Boys’ love” and “BL” are the generic names for this form of media in Japan and most of Asia.

The subgenre of shjo manga, sometimes known as comics for females, is where the genre first appeared in the 1970s. The new literary category was referred to by a number of names, including shnen-ai (lit. “boy love”), tanbi (lit. “aestheticism”), and June (lit. “dou ne”). The term “yaoi” first appeared in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the context of djinshi (, self-published works) culture as a portmanteau of “yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi,” which translates to “no climax, no point, no meaning.” The term was used in a self-deprecating manner to refer to amateur fan works that focused on sex to the exclusion of plot and character development Later on, in the 1990s, Japanese magazines began using the phrase “boys’ love” as an umbrella word for male-male romantic media that was targeted at female consumers.

Androgynous men, also known as bishnen, are one of the concepts and themes associated with yaoi. Other concepts and themes associated with yaoi include depictions of rape, diminished female characters, narratives that emphasize homosociality while de-emphasizing socio-cultural homophobia, and diminished female characters. The practice of matching characters in relationships according to the roles of seme, which can be translated as “sexual top” or “active pursuer,” and uke, which can be translated as “sexual bottom” or “passive pursued,” is one of the distinguishing characteristics of yaoi. Since the 1990s, Yaoi has had a strong presence all over the world. This has been accomplished via the worldwide licensing and distribution of its works, in addition to the unauthorised circulation of those works by Yaoi enthusiasts online. Scholars and journalists all around the globe have devoted time and energy to researching and writing about Yaoi fanworks, culture, and fandom.